Dr. Sue Haynes

About Dr. Sue Haynes

Sue specializes in reproductive biology and embryonic development, including the basic biology of embryonic and adult stem cells. She started her career studying the fruit fly’s genetic control of early embryonic and reproductive development. More

Wanted: Program Directors to Manage Grants in Developmental and Cellular Processes, Research/Student Research Development Programs

NIGMS is still looking for two program directors (also known as “health scientist administrators (HSA)/program officers”) to manage research grants and/or student research development program(s).

One position is in our Developmental and Cellular Processes Branch of the Division of Genetics and Developmental Biology. This branch supports research on the genetic and biochemical pathways that cells utilize in development and in normal physiological processes. Candidates should have expertise in the use of state-of-the-art molecular genetics and/or genomics-based approaches to address questions in these scientific areas.

The other position is in the Postdoctoral Training Branch of the Division of Training, Workforce Development, and Diversity. This branch supports research training, fellowship and career development programs for postdoctoral scientists. Candidates should have knowledge of and/or experience in understanding, planning and managing research/student research development program(s) at the postdoctoral or early stage investigator career level, including those targeted to groups that are underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral sciences. Candidates with expertise in innovations for teaching in STEM fields as well as research experience in other scientific areas within the NIGMS mission are also encouraged to apply.

For both positions, candidates should have leadership and strong oral and written communication skills. Familiarity with NIH extramural funding as a grant applicant, reviewer or NIH scientific administrator is preferred.

Vacancy announcements typically are open for 5 calendar days. We expect this one to open tomorrow and close at midnight on Tuesday, May 13, 2014. Please see the NIH HSA Web site for position requirements and application procedures. The Applying for Scientific Administration Jobs at NIGMS blog post offers additional background and tips.

Editor’s note: The announcement for candidates with current or former federal employment status Exit icon is posted at https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/369761700 Exit icon and closes on May 22. The one for candidates without such status is posted at https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/370019300 Exit icon and closes on May 24.

Wanted: Program Directors to Manage Grants in Developmental and Cellular Processes, Research/Student Research Development Programs

NIGMS is looking for two program directors (also known as “health scientist administrators/program officers”) to manage research grants and/or student research development program(s).

One position is in our Developmental and Cellular Processes Branch of the Division of Genetics and Developmental Biology. This branch supports research on the genetic and biochemical pathways that cells utilize in development and in normal physiological processes. Candidates should have expertise in the use of state-of-the-art molecular genetics and/or genomics-based approaches to address questions in these scientific areas.

The other position is in the Postdoctoral Training Branch of the Division of Training, Workforce Development, and Diversity. This branch supports research training, fellowship and career development programs for postdoctoral scientists. Candidates should have knowledge of and/or experience in understanding, planning and managing research/student research development program(s) at the postdoctoral or early stage investigator career level, including those targeted to groups that are underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral sciences. Candidates also should have expertise in innovations for teaching in STEM fields as well as research experience in other scientific areas within the NIGMS mission.

For both positions, candidates should have leadership, managerial, and strong oral and written communication skills. Familiarity with NIH extramural funding as a grant applicant, reviewer or NIH scientific administrator is a plus.

Vacancy announcements typically are open for only a very short time, and this one closes soon—Sunday, February 23. Please see the NIH HSA Web site for position requirements and application procedures. The Applying for Scientific Administration Jobs at NIGMS blog post offers additional background and tips.

Wanted: Program Director for Cellular Decision Processes Grants

We’re looking for a program director (also known as a “health scientist administrator/program officer”) to manage research grants and other types of awards focused on cellular decision processes, e.g., growth initiation, proliferation, cell senescence, terminal differentiation, sporulation and chemotaxis regulation. The position is in the Developmental and Cellular Processes Branch of our Division of Genetics and Developmental Biology.

Candidates should have expertise in the use of state-of-the-art molecular genetics and/or genomics-based approaches to elucidate mechanistic aspects of cell growth and differentiation, signaling pathway dynamics or related areas. Familiarity with NIH extramural funding as an applicant, reviewer or NIH scientific administrator is a plus, and outstanding communications skills are essential.

The vacancy announcement closes on April 30. Please see the NIH HSA Web site for position requirements and application procedures. The Applying for Scientific Administration Jobs at NIGMS blog post offers additional background and tips.

Not looking for a position right now? Please help us out by forwarding this information to others who might be interested in this opportunity.

Wanted: Program Director, Division of Genetics and Developmental Biology

We have a job opening for a program director (also known as a “health scientist administrator/program officer”) to manage research grants and other types of awards in the Developmental and Cellular Processes Branch of our Division of Genetics and Developmental Biology. The branch supports studies spanning the spectrum from the genetic basis of development and cell function to biochemical signaling pathways that underlie normal cell physiology.

We’re especially interested in candidates with expertise in developmental genetics or adaptive cellular responses to environmental stressors. Outstanding oral and written communication skills are essential, and familiarity with NIH extramural funding as an applicant, reviewer or NIH scientific administrator is a definite plus.

Please see the NIH HSA Web site for position requirements and detailed application procedures. This is a global recruitment for program officer positions throughout NIH, so be sure that your application materials emphasize aspects of your training, expertise and research interests that make it clear you’re a good fit for our job.

The vacancy announcement closes on June 26.

If you’re not looking for a position right now but know others who might be, please help us out by forwarding this information to them.

Save the Date for a Special Symposium

NIGMS 50th Anniversary Scientific Symposium“Investigate, Innovate, Inspire” is the theme of a special scientific symposium marking our 50th anniversary.  The event will be held at NIH on Wednesday, October 17, starting at 1:00 p.m.

Please join us in person or by videocast to hear these speakers talk about their NIGMS-supported research, how they recognize and develop exciting ideas, and how they train and mentor the next generation of biomedical scientists:

Carlos Daniel Bustamante, Ph.D. Exit icon
Professor of Biological Statistics and Computational Biology and Statistical Sciences and Associate Director, Center for Population and Comparative Genomics
Stanford University

“Population Genetics in the Personal Genome Era: Genomics for the World”

Kathleen Giacomini, Ph.D. Exit icon
Professor of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, and Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology and Co-chair, Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences
University of California, San Francisco

“Shifting Paradigms for Pharmacologic Research”

Timothy Mitchison, Ph.D. Exit icon
Hassib Sabbagh Professor of Systems Biology and Deputy Chair of Systems Biology
Harvard Medical School

“Microtubules: From Basic Biology to Cancer Drugs and Back Again”

The symposium, part of the DeWitt Stetten, Jr., Lecture series we started on our 20th anniversary, will also feature student poster presentations selected in competitions at a number of scientific meetings.

For more information about the event, e-mail me or Janna Wehrle.

Next Deadline for Collaborative Science Supplement Requests

The next application deadline for the Administrative Supplements for Collaborative Science (SCS) program is May 15, 2012. Applications may be submitted on paper, as described in the announcement, or through the electronic submission pilot for administrative supplement requests.

The SCS program provides supplements to support new collaborations that will advance the aims of the parent R01 or R37 grant, which must be actively funded through at least November 30, 2013. The most compelling supplement requests propose to take advantage of new scientific opportunities and involve collaborators from other disciplines.

SCS awards are very competitive, so you should talk to your program director to assess whether your ideas fit this program before writing an application.

Stem Cell Workshop Covered Field’s Progress, Challenges and Opportunities

In the decade since NIGMS began supporting human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, the field has made substantial strides, including the development of methods to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). As part of our ongoing commitment to basic research into the fundamental properties of pluripotent cells, we recently hosted our fourth biennial workshop for NIGMS grantees working in this research area. The 63 participants presented their latest research findings, exchanged ideas and discussed possibilities for collaboration.

The talks and posters focused on state-of-the-art hESC and iPSC research in four broad areas: pluripotency and self-renewal, technological approaches, differentiation mechanisms, and epigenetics and reprogramming. Several presentations highlighted significant advances in our understanding of the molecular complexes and signaling networks that control pluripotency and the transition to the differentiated state. As in previous workshops, it was exciting to see all the progress that has been made in the past two years.

The final session was on future directions and challenges. It included a discussion of the current state of the field and raised the important question of the nature, extent and significance of differences between hESC and iPSC. Jamie Thomson of the University of Wisconsin-Madison reminded everyone that these two types of pluripotent cells are remarkably similar and that differences may reflect genetic differences in the original cells and/or differences arising during growth in tissue culture.

The meeting concluded with a lively discussion that highlighted the participants’ opinions on the technical challenges, resource needs and key biological questions that will drive the field in the coming years. For more on this, read the workshop summary.

Collaborative Science Supplement Requests Due in January

Do unexpected results from your NIGMS-funded R01 or R37 project have you thinking about your research in a different way, or is there a new approach that will greatly advance the aims of your studies? Will you need a collaborator with appropriate expertise to proceed?

If you answered “yes” to these questions, you might consider applying for an administrative supplement for collaborative science (SCS). Now in its 4th year, the SCS program enables new collaborations that were not initially planned and therefore are not supported by the parent grant. Grants must be actively funded through at least July 31, 2013, to be eligible for the next submission deadline of January 15, 2012.

To be sure that your proposal is appropriate for this program, please read the NIH Guide notice, review the program description (no longer available) and discuss your plans with your NIGMS program director. For general questions about the program, e-mail me or Marion Zatz.

Collaborative Science Supplement Requests – Next Deadline Is in May

Have an idea for a great collaboration that will advance your NIGMS-funded research project? If your current award has active funding through at least November 30, 2012, you may be eligible to jump-start your idea with an administrative supplement for collaborative science. The next submission deadline is May 15, 2011.

To ensure that your project is appropriate for this program, please review the funding opportunity announcement. You should also discuss the project idea with your NIGMS program director before preparing an application. For general questions about the program, contact me or Marion Zatz.

Collaborative Science Supplement Requests Due in January

Do you have an idea for a great collaboration that will advance your NIGMS-funded research project? If your current award has active funding through at least July 31, 2012, you may be eligible to jump-start your idea with an administrative supplement for collaborative science. The next submission deadline is January 15, 2011.

To be sure that your project is appropriate for this program, please review the funding opportunity announcement. You should also discuss the project idea with your NIGMS program director before preparing an application. For general questions about the program, contact me at hayness@nigms.nih.gov or Marion Zatz at zatzm@nigms.nih.gov.