Discontinuing Our Participation in the NRSA Individual Predoctoral Fellowship (Parent F31) Program

We recently issued an NIH Guide notice informing the community that we will discontinue participation in the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship (Parent F31) (PA-16-309). As stated in the notice, we will not accept new or resubmission applications for this program, and its subsequent reissuances, starting with the April 8, 2018, receipt date. We will continue to accept NRSA Individual Predoctoral Fellowships to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (F31) (PA-16-308) and NRSA Individual Predoctoral MD/PhD or Other Dual-Doctoral Degree Fellowships for Students at Institutions Without NIH-Funded Institutional Predoctoral Dual-Degree Training Programs (F30) (PA-16-306). This decision does not affect those F31 (parent) applicants who have already received an award from NIGMS or whose applications have already been received by NIH and have been reviewed or are currently pending review.

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Wanted: Program Director, Biochemistry and Bio-related Chemistry Branch

UPDATE: The vacancy announcement for this position is now available and is open through February 7.

UPDATE: The vacancy announcement will be available beginning on January 29, 2018.

We’re recruiting for an accomplished scientist with experience in the chemical sciences to join the Biochemistry and Bio-related Chemistry Branch (BBC) of the Division of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry (PPBC). The successful applicant will have responsibility for both scientific and administrative management of a portfolio of grants (both research and training) and fellowships, to include: stimulating, planning, advising, directing, and evaluating program activities for the portfolio of research awards.

The BBC Branch supports basic research in areas of synthetic chemistry, biochemistry, bio-related chemistry, and the glycosciences. This position will include stewardship of grant awards related to creation of new synthetic methodologies, biosynthesis, and structure of macromolecules, synthesis of natural products, development of novel medicinal agents and mimics of macromolecular function, and/or the chemical basis of regulation and catalytic properties of enzymes.

Applicants should have expertise in chemistry, chemical biology, biological chemistry, or biochemistry, and should have experience in applications of chemistry to biological systems and/or therapeutics (for example, organic synthesis and methodology; biological catalysis and regulation; biotechnology, biosynthesis, and bioengineering; or chemical tools for manipulation of biological systems). Candidates should also have outstanding written and oral communication skills.

The position is included in the global recruitment for Health Scientist Administrators. The vacancy will only be open for a few days, beginning on January 29, 2018. For additional information about this position, see the announcement on the NIGMS website. Do not hesitate to ask questions about this position or the recruitment process. In preparing an application, Applying for Scientific Administration Jobs at NIGMS may offer other useful information.

Not looking to become a Health Scientist Administrator right now? Please help us out by forwarding this information to others who might be interested in this opportunity.

Wanted: Developmental and Cellular Processes Branch Chief

UPDATE: The vacancy announcement for this position is now available and is open through February 7. Make sure you apply for the supervisory HSA position.

UPDATE: The vacancy announcement will be available beginning on January 29, 2018.

We’re recruiting for an outstanding individual to serve as branch chief within our Division of Genetics and Developmental Biology (GDB). This person will oversee the scientific and administrative management of the Developmental and Cellular Processes (DCP) Branch and will be responsible for advising, directing, and evaluating program activities for a portfolio of research grants in one of the branch areas.

The GDB Division supports research into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie inheritance, gene expression, and development. The DCP Branch focuses on the genetic and biochemical pathways that cells utilize in development and in normal physiological processes. The research supported by the branch spans the spectrum from the genetic basis of development and cell function to biochemical signaling pathways that underlie normal cell physiology. Candidates should have expertise in any area of research supported by the branch. Familiarity with NIH extramural funding as an applicant, reviewer, or NIH scientific administrator is a plus, and outstanding written and oral communication skills are essential.

This position is included in the global recruitment for Health Science administrators which will only be open for a few days beginning on January 29, 2018. For additional information about this position, see the announcement on the NIGMS website. In preparing an application, Applying for Scientific Administration Jobs at NIGMS may offer other useful information.

Not looking for a position right now? Please help us out by forwarding this information to others who might be interested in this opportunity.

Snow Disruptions

As you have no doubt heard, the Washington, DC, region is recovering from a major snowstorm, with another on the way. Transportation is still challenging in places, and some people have experienced extended power outages. The Federal Government was closed yesterday and remains closed today.

Many NIGMS staff members are checking e-mail and doing other work remotely, but staff are not in the office to answer your phone calls.

Please bear with us as we do our best to keep working despite our unusually snowy weather.

What’s Your Recovery Act Story?

Recovery.gov - NIGMS InformationIf you’ve gotten funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, you know how important it is to tell people in your community that this support is having an impact. We want to hear from you, too. Your stories can help us show the American public how the Recovery Act is working to accelerate research, stimulate the economy, and create or retain jobs.

So please tell us about how this funding has helped you. The impact can be large or small, immediate or long-range. Did you hire a promising new scientist or keep someone from losing a job? Were you able to form new collaborations or purchase critical equipment? Did the Recovery Act help speed your research, enable you to make new discoveries, or advance science in other ways? For training programs, were you able to develop new curricula or other activities that you would not have been able to do otherwise?

We invite you to share your experiences now and in the future using our What’s Your Recovery Act Story? (no longer available)+ Web form. We’ll post a sampling of what you send us on our new Recovery Act Impact Web page. Check out the ones we’ve already posted there to see what your colleagues are saying.